oh, well, oh well




GLENDA // ANGRY FILIPINA BASED IN MIAMI

FUNWITHNEARLYNOTHING@GMAIL.COM
INSTAGRAM: @SHY_AND_KAWAII.JPG
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vandlo:

M.I.A. writing her album “Arular” - 2004 

vandlo:

M.I.A. writing her album “Arular” - 2004 

brown girl friendships are so important. we lift each other up when the world is so bent on tearing us down. bonding over hatred of racism, patriarchy, and classism is perfectly balanced out by channeling that anger into our creative work. it is a revolutionary act to realize that we aren’t alone in our struggles. so i dedicate this post to one of my bffs dynelyn, who has helped me embrace my inner angry n creative brown girl.


江口寿史

江口寿史

(Source: ombro-phobia)

Anonymous asks: isn't a white woman's unbrushed hair natural, though?
kszhdvkjndf:

ps1 

sandra’s style is 2 good

kszhdvkjndf:

ps1 

sandra’s style is 2 good

NY beanie

14,000원

(Source: daeum)

5ft1:

Kentaro Sakaguchi

so cute

(Source: seotaijiandboys)

aestheticgoddess:

Coral by Felix Salazar

aminaabramovic:

failure33-object:

aminaabramovic:

right now i see tons of awesome creative and exciting work from WOC in all artistic mediums with feminist/womanist motifs while also discussing how class/race/gender indentity intersect in their work and it’s fucking exciting so like lets stop waxing poetic about past movements that were generally exclusionary and lets take about the present/future wave of WOC of all races/classes etc making good fucking art

how blessed are we to live in this time!!! and to have a resource as far-reaching and accessible (to most, obv i’m not trying to make any extreme statements) as the internet to share and spread our art and our words? blessings! my mother always says that i am so lucky to be alive and thriving r i g h t n o w

RIGHT!! it’s truly amazing from a click of a button i can see and hear and watch all this art from WOC around the world it’s truly a great time 2 be alive and I can’t wait for what the future holds

yesss i’m so happy and lucky the internet is such an accessible resource for me. i’ve been able to find so many amazingly talented feminist/womanist artists and writers who embody the huge importance of narrative work in art. i’m so excited to watch these artists grow and continue to challenge exclusionary visions that are so rampant in the art world. when art reflects the state of our world—as in, the spaces WOC occupy—it is so fucking important and necessary, this is history and we are making it

vegan-yums:

*~* Vegan Fast Food *~*

i’m not a vegan AT ALL but these seem like reasonable meals that i can bring to work, yay

reggaetonadlibs:

let-them-eat-vag:

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

DUUUUDE this is a huge fucking deal honestly

GO THE FUCK OFF

reggaetonadlibs:

let-them-eat-vag:

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

DUUUUDE this is a huge fucking deal honestly

GO THE FUCK OFF

cerceos:

Andreas Volwahsen

Living Architecture: India - 1969

thecoalitionmag:

girlhood, class, and race: a not-so-very-in-depth article on the differences between girlhoods and acknowledging said differences)
A few weeks ago, I got a message on my personal tumblr asking me about Rookie Mag. I’m sure this person has been following me for a long while before asking this question because even though I hadn’t expressed any feelings about Rookie Mag lately, I have done so a few times before on previous blogs and whoever this was wanted me to touch on the subject once more and um I did. And now that I’m back on the issue, I can’t unstick from it. The issue of girlhood and class.
The rise of zines and magazines that cater to and are created by teenage girls to talk about feminism and girlhood is at an all-time high and I couldn’t be happier, really, because this is my forte and these are the things I care more about and could spend hours talking about. So the fact that more emphasis is being put on girlhood, telling girls about feminism and womanism, cultivating our own views about feminism and womanism…I really couldn’t be happier to be alive at a time like this and to be a part of it. But, as it is with western feminism, there are so many cracks and flaws within this movement that I simply will not ignore and will not stop talking about. And this is not something new, you know. The topic of how flawed and just shitty western feminism is has been talked about, time and time again.  And it’s not like we can ignore it because a)we don’t want to, and b)western feminism is so rampant and hard to escape, you can’t help but notice how busted it is.
The issue of girlhood correlating with class and race is one that a lot of girls avoid because it makes them feel uncomfortable and brings up conflict. Obviously.  So everyone retreats back to the whole “let’s spread glitter over our uteruses and call it a day” type of feminism because we simply don’t want to talk about what differentiates us and what makes our girlhoods different.  When asked about how I felt about rookie mag, I said that my girlhood was hardly, if at all, represented or acknowledged. And that’s a big fucking deal because rookie is supposed to be a site for teenage girls. My goal is not to rip Rookie Mag and any other publications/sites/zines by the jugular but rather to be frank about an issue that cannot be approached any other way. You have to be frank and honest when it comes to discussing race and class and how it correlates with girlhood, I don’t care about how uncomfortable you are with the issue you simply cannot eliminate a group of girls because you are uncomfortable. I’m not saying that you should bring up class and race in every conversation, while hanging out with your girls (duh) but acknowledge the facts. Acknowledge these things that separate us and acknowledge the differences between our girlhoods and acknowledge that REPRESENTATION IS SO VERY IMPORTANT. I don’t like sugarcoating and/or glossing over an issue in order to make another party feel comfortable, especially if I am doing it at an expense. So I won’t approach issues of race and class in that manner and would really like it if others didn’t.

thecoalitionmag:

girlhood, class, and race: a not-so-very-in-depth article on the differences between girlhoods and acknowledging said differences)

A few weeks ago, I got a message on my personal tumblr asking me about Rookie Mag. I’m sure this person has been following me for a long while before asking this question because even though I hadn’t expressed any feelings about Rookie Mag lately, I have done so a few times before on previous blogs and whoever this was wanted me to touch on the subject once more and um I did. And now that I’m back on the issue, I can’t unstick from it. The issue of girlhood and class.

The rise of zines and magazines that cater to and are created by teenage girls to talk about feminism and girlhood is at an all-time high and I couldn’t be happier, really, because this is my forte and these are the things I care more about and could spend hours talking about. So the fact that more emphasis is being put on girlhood, telling girls about feminism and womanism, cultivating our own views about feminism and womanism…I really couldn’t be happier to be alive at a time like this and to be a part of it. But, as it is with western feminism, there are so many cracks and flaws within this movement that I simply will not ignore and will not stop talking about. And this is not something new, you know. The topic of how flawed and just shitty western feminism is has been talked about, time and time again.  And it’s not like we can ignore it because a)we don’t want to, and b)western feminism is so rampant and hard to escape, you can’t help but notice how busted it is.

The issue of girlhood correlating with class and race is one that a lot of girls avoid because it makes them feel uncomfortable and brings up conflict. Obviously.  So everyone retreats back to the whole “let’s spread glitter over our uteruses and call it a day” type of feminism because we simply don’t want to talk about what differentiates us and what makes our girlhoods different.  When asked about how I felt about rookie mag, I said that my girlhood was hardly, if at all, represented or acknowledged. And that’s a big fucking deal because rookie is supposed to be a site for teenage girls. My goal is not to rip Rookie Mag and any other publications/sites/zines by the jugular but rather to be frank about an issue that cannot be approached any other way. You have to be frank and honest when it comes to discussing race and class and how it correlates with girlhood, I don’t care about how uncomfortable you are with the issue you simply cannot eliminate a group of girls because you are uncomfortable. I’m not saying that you should bring up class and race in every conversation, while hanging out with your girls (duh) but acknowledge the facts. Acknowledge these things that separate us and acknowledge the differences between our girlhoods and acknowledge that REPRESENTATION IS SO VERY IMPORTANT. I don’t like sugarcoating and/or glossing over an issue in order to make another party feel comfortable, especially if I am doing it at an expense. So I won’t approach issues of race and class in that manner and would really like it if others didn’t.

immigrantgirls:

aminaabramovic:

like riot grrl as a scene wasn’t like woopsie daisy can’t believe no WOC wanted to sign up and join us there was legitimate hostility towards WOC during that movement that’s been documented as well as the inability for many riot grrls to understand intersections of oppression and their own role in upholding it

i mean sonically and aesthetically you can like the riot grrl movement but lets not pretend like there wasn’t huge and glaring flaws about it like every other feminist wave or scene that was primarily white women

right! ppl dont get it when i say that the lack of women of colour is always, ALWAYS, a concious thing and never an accident/coincident. stay woke.